12 Strange Truths In A Snowy Climate

12 Strange Truths In A Snowy Climate

  Living in a snowy climate can be fun if you like snow, but it can result in some strange lifestyle adaptations. For instance, you discover that gloves don't keep your fingers warm and you double up on mittens, and you end up owning an excessive, yet completely justifiable, number of hats. These truths were inspired by my morning haul of the kids to school in a sled. What can you add?   1. You carry kitty litter or crushed gravel wherever you go   http://gph.is/2hQU9KP   2. Adding skis or sleds to everything becomes a necessary form of transportation http://gph.is/1NlUNON   3. You have a hat for every type of weather http://gph.is/1Zt2TX7 4. Like socks, you have orphaned mittens but you keep these orphans in vain hope that someday it's pair is discovered in another storage bag and they can finally be reunited. However, by then, your child's hands have outgrown the mittens, and they end up in the donate pile. Surprise! http://gph.is/195IEsW 5. Your bed never feels as cozy as it does in the winter http://gph.is/Vx8ZaB 6. You don't want to...
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My Kids Will Never Be “American as Apple Pie”

My Kids Will Never Be “American as Apple Pie”

Cultural Identity Identity changes occur often throughout all of our lives. Changes in growth and development, family structure, education, and career all result in remarkably complex personal transitions. Far and away, the shift in our cultural identity—who we identify ourselves as and how we label ourselves—is a challenge for many people to handle on a daily basis. Identity changes happen to everyone—children, teenagers, college students, stay-at-home moms, moms who work in an office, dads, military families, retirees—basically anyone who has ever lived a life where things change—everyone. But since I am a person living abroad and raising her children in a foreign country, I will speak from my perspective. "American as Apple Pie" I read an article written by a mother who has taken her children to 30 different countries and considers her family to be serial expats. And while I agreed with her goal of raising global citizens who are adept at handling the challenges of a global world, I disagreed with her on her last...
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Top Baby Names Around The World 2017

Top Baby Names Around The World 2017

Choosing your baby's name is an incredibly difficult task. Will it suit their personality? Will it be easy to pronounce? Spell? Nicknames? Yes or no? Will they hate us for the name we choose and decide to go by their middle name? Finding a name that you and your partner can agree on is the first task but then finding a name that provides your child as many options as possible is equally important. The book, Freakonomics, has an entire baby name chapter that terrified me into choosing a name that was easy to pronounce and spell. Statistically, employers have been known to cast aside resumes with uniquely spelled names and I didn't want my children discriminated against later on in life as adults. When we were choosing names for our children we wanted uncommon but not unusual names. I read all of the books and scrolled through endless websites but lightning never struck. It was important to me that my children's names would fit their personalities as...
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When The Exciting Life Feels Normal

When The Exciting Life Feels Normal

  When we first moved to Sweden (five years ago, ahh!), the newness of everything was overwhelming. Every day we jumped into the unknown with glee. It was thrilling to have a clean slate. We could be whoever we wanted to be in this new place. I spent the first few weeks converting everything into measurements that I could understand and then again into USD to get a sense of the cost. Everything felt expensive (it was). But it was okay because this was all new and exciting. Snow on April 1? Not depressing. Let's play! Get incredibly lost while trying to find a particular restaurant only to discover that they are closed on Sundays? It's alright. We'll get pizza from around the corner. Spend hours in line to get a national ID card, fill out forms, and hope that you've done everything correctly in a language you don't understand? Kind of scary, yes, but we're hanging in there. Everything we did felt like a strange but wonderful adventure....
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Happy Birthday! We’ve come a long way, baby

Happy Birthday! We’ve come a long way, baby

  It has been a full 12 months since the publication of Knocked Up Abroad and I am celebrating by making it FREE to download on Amazon January 26-29, 2017. I want more readers, more reviews, and more people to discover the amazingness that is held within this book. It's been a crazy year—two books published, one successful crowdfunding campaign, book launch parties around the world, and countless articles, podcasts, and other efforts to promote the series. The first year is always the hardest with growing pains, learning curves, and teething. If I had to plot my knowledge of self-publishing against a growth chart, it would look something like this:   Notice how I added stress to the second x-axis? That's because learning something new is stressful and painful. I stepped way outside of my comfort zone and I am still feeling the effects of living on the fringe of comfort. Lessons learned I have learned a lot about self-publishing, crowdfunding, and collaborating with women (and two dads, can't forget...
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Heading Back During A Tumultuous Time

Heading Back During A Tumultuous Time

  I'm about to get on a plane for 12 hours and fly straight into the face of the unknown.   I'm not heading in for a family trip, holiday, or celebration. I'm making this difficult, time-consuming trek because I feel compelled. Something is pulling me. I must go.   New friends, old friends, and whoever I meet along the way will all be a part of this wave of energy. A hopeful turn of the tides. A show of change, positivity, and unity.   I have witnessed firsthand what women can accomplish when they organize. It is empowering, bold, and beautiful. When we set aside our differences and focus on our commonalities, we can break down barriers. Build bridges.   Discover how we are the same and the differences no longer seem to matter. We may define "best" for our families differently and approach it in various ways—there is no one path in life—but we are all trying our best.   My good friend, Clara Wiggins, talks about the uncertainty...
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5 Reasons Why Stroller Naps Are The Best Naps

5 Reasons Why Stroller Naps Are The Best Naps

When we moved to Stockholm, Sweden from the US, I noticed that there was a line of strollers parked outside of the cafes during the daytime. I heard the faint sound of a baby making noise tucked under a bundle of blankets. The movement of little feet indicated that the baby was waking up. What was the protocol here? Should I let the mother inside the cafe know? It wasn't long as I stood frozen in moral dilemma than I saw a beautiful Swedish woman zip out of the cafe and head straight to her impeccably chic bassinet stroller—the source of the baby noises. She scooped up her baby and went back inside to sit with the other mothers enjoying their coffees. She had been keeping a watchful eye on her baby through the cafe window and was completely relaxed about the entire situation.   Why are stroller naps the best? Babies sleep outside in all types of weather in Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland...
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Raising a Viking Child

Raising a Viking Child

  A while back, I wrote an article for ParentCo called, "5 Steps to Raising a Viking Child" and it was by far my most popular article to date. The folks at ParentCo contacted me and asked me if they could transform the tips in the article into a shareable video and I absolutely love the end result. I think the video turned out great and even our dog makes a brief cameo. The kids laughed when they saw Bessie's rumpa walking away. It's nice to have a few snippets of their childhood turned into a cohesive video. I hope it inspires more parents to take their kids outside for some adventure and fun.   Here are five steps to help you raise your own little Viking through outdoor play: 1. Be creative and the world becomes magical Even the most familiar and mundane playground can become an entryway to another world if you encourage your child’s creativity. That’s not a slide, it’s an elephant’s trunk. That swing is...
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Guiding the Newbies

Guiding the Newbies

Newbies We've all been newbies at one point or another—whether it was in high school, college, or that first year living abroad. One thing is constant—newbies generally have no idea what they are doing. The days can be long and frustrating when mistakes start to build on one another. All of a sudden, one more thing becomes one too many and that filmmjölk which you thought was creamer but turned out to be sour milk (why would anyone sell me sour milk?!) really ruins your morning coffee and you have a mini-nervous breakdown in your three square meter kitchen. But making all of those mistakes must count for something and now you oldies (experienced expats/foreigners/migrants) can pass on your wisdom to new people moving into your country. The Newbie Guide To Sweden provides that previously word-of-mouth service to newbies via their website with lots of tips and tricks to navigating life in Sweden as a foreigner. Their blog is full of been-there-and-done-that stories to help guide the newbies and I...
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A Tale Of Two Kindergartens—USA and Sweden

A Tale Of Two Kindergartens—USA and Sweden

What do two kindergarten classes separated by an ocean, language, and culture have in common? In what ways do they differ? What are five-year-olds expected to learn while attending preschool in the US and Sweden? Are there any advantages or disadvantages to each kindergarten's approach? I interviewed two kindergarten teachers—one in the US and one in Sweden—and their answers may surprise you. Both kindergartens emphasize play-based learning, social-cognitive skills, and developing necessary skills (e.g., cutting with scissors and drawing) but the ways in which each teacher approaches these concepts differs broadly. This is a peek into the work and energy that goes into teaching our children. When comparing two classrooms in two different countries, it is impossible to make broad generalizations. These responses cannot and are not intended to represent all American and Swedish kindergartens as a whole but rather, to offer parents some insights to the cultural differences and approaches to education.   How many students are in your kindergarten classroom?   USA: 23 Sweden: 21   What...
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