Celebrating Holidays When Living Abroad

Celebrating Holidays When Living Abroad

Holidays have a special place in our hearts. We grow up with certain traditions—some wacky, some practical, and some that sound crazy when we try to explain them to outsiders. Regardless of how we choose to celebrate our special holidays, celebrating a special occasion outside of the country of origin may make things a bit more complicated. For one, there are no seasonal reminders that the holiday is approaching. As Sundae mentions in our podcast discussion, in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, there are no changing colors of the leaves to indicate the traditional autumn season is upon us. It can create some last minute scrambling if you have to source food or decorations or have to make things from scratch, as one often has to. We have dropped many US traditions except for a few—Thanksgiving being the one that we've held onto the tightest. Thanksgiving isn't celebrated in Sweden like it is in the US—or at all, really. Technically Tacksgiving is a day...
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The Perfect Relocation in an Ideal World

The Perfect Relocation in an Ideal World

In an ideal world, there would be only perfect relocations. A world in which everything goes according to plan, nobody is running around at the last minute all sweaty with stress, and the children are well behaved on every flight and breeze through connecting airports. In this ideal world, here's what a perfect relocation might look like: In a perfect relocation, there is plenty of time to prepare, find renters/buyers for your current house, sell off unwanted possessions, and close your door one final time without a hint of sadness. In a perfect relocation, you have familiarized yourself with the local language and have language classes lined up to help ease your family into society upon arrival. In a perfect relocation, you get one last visit with all of your family members, and your friends throw you an amazing farewell party complete with meaningful gifts and inside jokes. In a perfect relocation, these same friends and family members promise to keep in touch and they do!...
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Expat Entrepreneurs: Do they have the answers?

Expat Entrepreneurs: Do they have the answers?

  Motherhood didn't kill my career—moving abroad did. And by "killing my career" I mean that moving abroad completely changed how I needed to view my employment opportunities. It forced me embrace a field that used to terrify me—entrepreneurship. I never thought I'd be an entrepreneur. Not in a million years. Entrepreneurism was too risky, too uncertain, and too extroverted for my inner nerdy introvert to ever consider as a possible career choice. Besides, I'm pretty skilled at learning languages and motivated to integrate into local society. Finding a traditional local job will be a snap, right? Not quite...   I don't have the "risk-taking gene" or the "wanderlust gene" gene, I have the my-brain-needs-to-be-engaged-to-be-happy gene and when landing a job in my field ended up being much more difficult than I had imagined, entrepreneurship was my best option. If you don't like the term entrepreneur, embrace the term, "digital nomad." It's so much sexier and sounds like we are very 21st century, no? But why is everyone pushing...
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Moving Abroad With Children

Moving Abroad With Children

The fourth article in the Global Women Discuss Love, Loss, and Family Abroad series between Gabrielle of the Expat Coffee Club and a few Knocked Up Abroad Again contributors tackles moving abroad and the emotional challenges associated with these large transitions. Gabrielle: When my parents told me that we were moving, I was devastated. Despite the fact that we were not leaving the country, this move seemed like the end of the world to me. I was leaving a school that I loved, great friends, and a fun neighborhood for the complete unknown. My friends and I promised to keep in touch and see each other often, but being dependent on our parents to drive us an hour one way just so that we could see each other, such a promise quickly fell through. Although it was not a new country, it sure felt like it. The people, the language, and the culture in Quebec were all so very different from what I had known. Furthermore,...
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Parenting During Abrupt Transitions—Burkina Faso and Sundae Schneider-Bean

Parenting During Abrupt Transitions—Burkina Faso and Sundae Schneider-Bean

Sundae Schneider-Bean is an intercultural specialist from the US who has traveled the world and expatriated to Switzerland with her Swiss husband. They moved to Burkina Faso for two and a half years with their young children and, finding themselves on neutral ground (not the US or Switzerland), really jelled as a family unit. Happy memories and experiences were sometimes interrupted  by new challenges as a parent when the country underwent country-wide demonstrations, a political uprising, a transitional government, and a coup d’état. While not ever necessarily feeling that she or her family would be targeted directly in these events, the terrorist attack in Ouagadougou left a feeling of uncertainty that was hard to shake. Parenting during abrupt transitions is never easy and often times we look to others to see what they would do in our situation. [Tweet "Parenting during abrupt transitions is never easy."] How did Sundae and her husband ultimately decide how to make a very difficult decision for their family?...
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